About

WHY THE GRASSHOPPER?

Entertational news for the left of center right leaning informational spectator.

In our world of instant access to information, current events, and deluge of opinion we merge both entertainment and information to entertain, provoke, and enlighten. Differing from Infotainment which has become synonymous with the 30-minute commercial, Entertation entertains you with information through provocation.

Our provocation, sometimes satirical challenges our readers to question and ponder that which may not be easily understood from popular perspectives. But also it is for readers to exercise logic and reason to resist the ease at which propaganda can pervade social consciousness if not properly examined, exposed, or rightly ridiculed.

The Grasshopper does not like propaganda for it manipulates without rational thought using populist sentiment producing class stratification in culture. The purpose of manipulation is a clear and simple motivation to enslave people for the benefit of the selected few greedy individuals. Humanity has too long suffered under this yoke of the divine right of kings that changes form to hide its true intentions.

So here is this Grasshopper that jumps from source to source questioning the way events are reported while looking for a grain of meaning. Sometimes with outrage, sometimes with sarcasm but always to let you decide for yourself what is the truth.

What’s In a Name?

The Grasshopper is in reference to The Grasshopper Lies Heavy, a fictional book within Phillip K. Dicks work The Man in the High Castle. His work is about an alternate timeline in which the Axis powers have won World War II. In this dystopian novel, the Grasshopper Lies Heavy is subversive literature that describes another timeline in which the Allies win the war but with some minor differences to the reality known to the reader.  In all, there are three paths with which the reader is confronted, two that are the possible and one that is the truth.

This truth in the book is represented by Hexagram 61 of the I Ching. This hexagram is known as Zhong Fu, meaning the Inner Truth or Center Returning.

Grasshopper News presents the events of our world with the idealism of the left to challenge the pragmatism of the right. You the reader are the third side of the perspective and what remains is Zhong Fu, your Inner Truth or Center Returning.

We exist now in an age of information that has changed the understanding of our civilization. Ancient forces of desire and fear are aligning to fundamentally impact the course of our future. They can either be our enlightenment or our enslavement but as long as we return to center the path will remain equal.

Seven Techniques of Propaganda

From: http://www.schooljournalism.org/recognizing-types-of-propaganda-in-advertising/

Transfer:
The act of relating something or someone we like or respect with a product. Symbols are constantly used in this form of propaganda.

  • Common Symbols
    • The flag represents the nation.
    • Uncle Sam represents a consensus of public opinion.
    • A cross represents Christianity.
  • Transfer devices can be used both for and against causes and ideas.
  • Examples:
    • On TV commercials, actors in white lab coats tell us that Brand X cold medicine is better that Brand Y.
    • During the 2000 campaign, Gov. George Bush used the American flag as part of his logo.
    • During the 2000 campaign, Vice President Al Gore used the colors, stars and stripes of the flag for his logo.
  • Ask yourself:
    • In the most simple and concrete terms, what is the proposal of the speaker?
    • What is the meaning of the thing from which the propagandist is seeking to transfer authority, sanction and prestige?
    • Is there any legitimate connection between the proposal of the advertiser and the revered thing, person or institution?
    • Leaving the propagandistic trick out of the picture, what are the merits of the proposal viewed alone?
    • Does this carry over the authority, sanction and prestige of something we respect and revere to something the speaker would have us accept?

Glittering Generalities:
The act of referring to words or ideas that evoke a positive emotional response from an audience. Virtue words are often used.

  • Glittering generalities are intensely emotionally appealing words so closely associated with highly-valued concepts and beliefs that they carry conviction without supporting information or reason.
  • They appeal to such emotions as love of country, home; desire for peace, freedom, glory, honor, etc.
  • They ask for approval without examination of the reason. Though the words and phrases are vague and suggest different things to different people, their connotation is always favorable.
  • Examples:
    • Food products will quickly label their foods as low-fat hinting that they are more healthy, when, in fact, the product might be high in calories.
    • Advertisers will sometimes give an incomplete comparison like “better tasting.”
      Better tasting than what? Spam? Dirt?
    • Cascade claims that their detergent will leave your dishes virtually spotless. In other words, there will be some spots.
    • Politicians will associate themselves with concepts which have positive connotations. For example, George W. Bush claimed to have a compassionate conservatism as opposed to the more negative reference to the conservative right.
  • Virtue Words:
    • Virtually, More, New
    • Low Fat, Better, Pride
    • Honor, Peace, Happiness
    • Prosperity, Freedom
  • Ask yourself:
    • What does the virtue word really mean?
    • Does the idea in question have a legitimate connection with the real meaning of the word?
    • Is an idea that does not serve my best interests being sold to me merely though its being given a name I like?
    • Leaving the virtue word out of consideration, what are the merits of the idea itself?

Card Stacking:
The strategy of showing the product’s best features, telling half-truths, and omitting or lying about its potential problems.

  • In using this technique, facts are Selected and presented which most effectively strengthen and authenticate the point of view of the propagandist. It includes the collection of all available material pertaining to a subject and the Selection of that material which most effectively supports the propaganda line.
  • Card stacking, case making, and censorship are all forms of Selection. Success or failure depends on how successful the propagandist is in Selecting facts or “cards and presenting or “stacking” them.
  • Example:
    • Drug manufacturers do this frequently in ads in which they skim over the possible harmful side effects of their products. Facts are Selected and presented which most effectively strengthen and authenticate the point of view of the propagandist.

Testimonial:
The use of well-known, respected people to endorse a product or service.

    • Testimonial places the official sanction of a respected person or authority on a product. This is done in an effort to cause the target audience to identify itself with the authority or to accept the authority’s opinions and beliefs as its own.
    • In testimonial ads, a person, either a celebrity or a representative of “everyman,” praises the product or service. In the case of the everyman approach, the idea is to have consumers relate to the person describing his or her experience with the product of service. If it fills their need, it should fill the consumer’s need.
    • For celebrity testimonials, the intent is to associate the product or service with a famous person. If the famous person believes the product is acceptable, then the idea is that consumers will believe the product is OK.
    • Examples:
      • Jane Russell: “I am delighted with Springboard products and have felt much better since I started using them.”
      • Oscar Meyer created an ad for its food products using George Foreman, a recognizable boxer, as the celebrity providing a testimonial for the product. Michael Jordan is the most commonly used sports figure for testimonials.
      • Tiger Woods lends his name to Nike.
      • Testimonials are intensely emotionally appealing words so closely associated with highly-valued concepts and beliefs that they carry conviction without supporting information or reason.

Plain Folks:
The use of everyday people to sell a product or service. Speakers and ads appear to make the person be “one of the people.”

  • Designed to win the confidence of the audience by communicating in the common manner and style of the audience.
  • Propagandists use ordinary language and mannerisms (and clothes in face-to-face and audiovisual communications) in attempting to identify their point of view with that of the average person.
  • With the plain folks device, the propagandist can win the confidence of persons who resent or distrust foreign sounding, intellectual speech, words, or mannerisms.
  • Examples:
    • America’s recent presidents have all been millionaires, but they have gone to great lengths to present themselves as ordinary citizens.
    • Bill Clinton eats at McDonald’s.
    • Ronald Reagan chops wood.
    • Jimmy Carter was a humble peanut farmer.
  • Ask yourself:
    • What are his ideas worth when separated from his personality?
    • What could he be trying to cover up with the plain folk’s approach?
    • What are the facts?

Bandwagon:
Bandwagon attempts to persuade the target audience to take a course of action “everyone else is taking.” “Join the crowd.” This technique reinforces people’s natural desire to be on the winning side.

  • The basic idea behind the bandwagon approach is just that, “getting on the bandwagon.” The propagandist puts forth the idea that everyone is doing something, or everyone supports this person/cause, so you should too.
  • The bandwagon approach appeals to the conformist in all of us: No one wants to be left out of what is perceived to be a popular trend.
  • Examples
    • McDonald’s touts that billions have been served.
    • World War II posters encouraged others to buy bonds by showing how many other people had bought one.
  • Ask yourself:
    • What is this propagandist’s program?
    • What is the evidence for and against the program?
    • Regardless of the fact that others are supporting this program, should I support it?
    • Does the program serve or undermine my individual and collective interests?
  • This technique reinforces people’s natural desire to be on the winning side.

Name calling:
The use of names that evoke fear or hatred in the viewer. The name-calling technique links a person, or idea, to a negative symbol.

  • The most obvious type of name calling involved “bad names.” For example:
    • Fascist
    • Pig
    • Yuppie Scum
    • Bum
  • A more subtle form of name-calling involves words or phrases that are Selected because they possess a negative charge. For example
    • Social engineering
    • Radical
    • Stingy
    • Counter-culture
  • Examples:
    • A poster that is a play on World War II posters. Communism is equated with downloading MP3s.
    • Bill Gates has also been subject to a little name calling.
  • Ask yourself:
    • What does the name mean?
    • Does the idea in question have a legitimate connection with the real meaning of the name?
    • Is an idea that serves my best interests being dismissed through giving it a name I don’t like?
    • Leaving the name out of consideration, what are the merits of the idea itself?
  • The name-calling technique links a person, or idea, to a negative symbol.